The plot to revive Mt. Gox and repay victims’ Bitcoin ...

My recent wire experience

Want to relay my recent experience to help other canucks entering the cryptocurrency scene. I wanted to invest 100K in both main coins and some alt coins. Depositing that amount can’t be done using ETF/bank-transfeetc. – the only reasonably quick way is to wire funds. For wires, most exchanges have a percentage based deposit fee – something that makes absolutely no sense to me. Whether you wire 1K or 1MM, the amount of work for the exchange is identical, so it should be a flat fee. Deciding on an exchange is more complicated than that though: each one has their own rules for minimums/maximums, trading fees, supported coins, holding periods, and withdrawal fees. They also can vary greatly on the amount of time verification takes. One thing to note is that pretty much all exchanges don’t charge a fee for inbound crypto transfers.
2 months ago I signed up for 10 exchanges (Coinbase/GDAX, Binance, Coinsquare, Kraken, ezBTC, QuadrigaCX, Bitfinex, Gemeni, Bittrex, Poloniex) and was verified on 7 of them (I’m still in queue for Gemeni, Bittrex, and Poloniex). Verification times gave me what I thought was a decent indicator of the level and quality of support I would receive.
Of these exchanges, some have what I believe to be relatively high trading fees (Gemeni .25%, Bittrex, .25%, ezBTC .30%, QuadrigaCX .50%) vs lower maketaker fees (GDAX 0/.3%, Binance .1/.1%, Gitfinex .1/.2%, Coinsquare .1/.2%, Kraken .16/.26%). Still others have high percentage based wire fees. And finally, there’s a big disparity between withdrawal fees: free on some exchanes, vs fixed rate based on the coin for others, vs Coinsquare’s insane fixed 0.0025 BTC regardless of what coin or the amount being withdrawn.
So here are some observations on the exchanges. Please note that the below is not a reflection on any of the people who work at the exchanges. I’m sure they are working as hard as they can and are doing their best. It’s just my experience. It’s also not financial advice. Also, I’m only human so feel free to offer corrections or better advice.
Coinsquare: amazingly fast verification time, and for very large deposits seems to likely be the best option as they will let you speak to a human being by phone and will waive the deposit fee (I didn’t know this until later though). I excluded them because of their high 0.5% percentage based deposit fee and their crazy high withdrawal fee. They also only have support for 6 coins.
QuadrigaCX: I had a terrible initial experience with QuadrigaCX’s support, so I immediately excluded them. They have high trading fees and there are many complaints of support tickets being ignored or having extremely lengthy wait times. They have a crazy high 1% percentage based CAD wire fee, but offer free USD wires. Note that they only support wires for large amounts.
GDAX/Coinbase: Loads of good reviews, but only has support for 4 coins. Seems like they also don’t have a fee for crypto withdrawals. You also can’t seem to wire CAD or USD funds directly to GDAX. I think you may have to wire USD funds to Coinbase and then transfer them over to GDAX (for free).
Kraken: I created an account but the verification page just appeared blank for me. After a few days, their support team got back to me telling me that they had a bug and that I needed to create a new account using a different email address and try again. That worked. I decided to use them as they seemed like the best all-around alternative. I was impressed with their support response (they gave me an answer that worked and responded in days as opposed to weeks), they offer a no-fee inbound CAD wire, support 16 coins, and have low (though not free) crypto withdrawal fees. They have also been around a while and have a good reputation (They were picked to handle MtGox claims). Wiring funds to them was a hair-raising experience though. You basically need to send your funds to an unknown bank in Tokyo, Japan. Kraken also has two slightly different sets of wire instructions: one that is on their website, and the other that their support folks send out. Only one of them mentions that you should tell your bank not to use an intermediary that will convert your currency. If you do things properly, and are lucky, you end up only paying ~$40 in fees. But chances are, you don’t, and end up paying 4%! (see https://www.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/7rd6k8/fees_when_sending_to_krakencom/). You also have no idea how much the fees will be until the money finally shows up in your account. That’s tremendously unsettling. Luckily my bank branch manager was familiar with crypto currency wires and helped me do things properly. But, the wire took over 2 weeks to show up (Jan 18th), and Kraken support is so overloaded that they didn’t’ respond, despite me escalating my support ticket several times. I eventually had to resort to a reddit post to get a response to my support ticket. I gave support my wire receipt and answered lots of additional questions to help them try to “locate” it. Perhaps the worst part of my entire experience was that while my wire was being located, the entire crypto market tanked by 50%...and no one would respond to my support ticket…I felt helpless. A Kraken support rep a few days ago said that they are handing >50K new user registrations per day and have >20K new support tickets per day. I feel they should turn off new user registrations until they are capable of servicing existing customers. This is what their competitors have done. I found it disheartening to learn that the only way to get a response to my support ticket was to complain via social media --- many others have found the same. While I was waiting for my wire to appear Kraken had a >48h outage. Prior to the outage, the site was almost unusable as you’d receive constant 50x errors (I found this out prior to wiring my funds). After the outage, I find that their site is still barely usable. Pages take 10-15 seconds to load and when they do load many times they display errors so you have to continually retry until things work. At the end of the day though, they did come through for me: my wire arrived safely. So with my funds in Kraken, I tried to use them to purchase crypto. But no matter what I tried, none of the CAD dollar trading pairs would appear. I logged out and back in a few times and 15 minutes later, it suddenly started appearing. With the flakiness in Kraken’s platform, I had no choice but to transfer everything to a more stable and faster exchange:
Binance: These guys have their shit in order. Super simple site navigation once you get used to it, fast verification times, blazingly fast website and trading engine, more than 50 coins supported, etc. But, they don’t support fiat – you must use one of the other exchanges to buy crypto with fiat and then transfer in your crypto. Gotta say it again: everything is super fast. Not just the page loads, but also trading, email confirmations, and withdrawals. Trading takes a bit of getting used to as you aren’t really buying or selling crypto…you are instead “trading” one crypto coin for another. Depending on the coin you want to purchase, you might have to trade your coin for BNB (binance’s own coin) and then trade BNB for the coin you desire.
Be Your Own Bank: One final word of advice. Binance is awesome, but don’t trust anyone as despite everyone’s best intentions: no matter how secure a platform is, it can and will be hacked. As soon as you have done your shopping, transfer your coins off to your own wallet. This is why withdrawal fees are important.
You might be asking: in hindsight, if I had to do it all over again, what would I do differently? To wire CAD funds I would try to use Coinsquare if it’s a big amount (after re-reading other people’s recent reviews). For USD wires, I might try using Gemeni, but I still haven’t been verified by them and have been waiting for almost 2 months. Before using either I would re-test how long it takes for a support ticket to be responded to. If you do wire funds, don't wire an exact round amount like "10,000.00", instead I would wire "10,070.45" so that it's easier to locate if things go wrong. Once the account has been funded I wouldn’t hesitate to transfer everything to another exchange if I wasn’t happy with the platform, the number of coin offerings, or quality of service I was receiving: you can always come back when things improve.
Things change so quickly so not sure how helpful this will be…just wished I had known some of the above before starting.
submitted by ignacvucko to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Evolution of Exchanges

Swap.Online delves into the background of centralized and decentralized cryptocurrency exchanges. As decentralization is our name for the game, we would primarily like to find out whether it was inevitable or not.

From Childhood to the Golden Age: DCEs and CEXs

The first centralized cryptocurrency exchanges had two main pre-historical roots of origin. Ideologically, they originated from the e-commerce exchange services of the early 2000s. Digital Currency Exchanges, or DCEs, were particularly popular in the U.S. and Australia. GoldAge Inc., E-Gold Inc., Liberty Reserve were frequently seen in the headlines mostly due to legal issues, as the U.S. SEC, as well as the Australian ASIC failed many times over to figure out whether the e-gold exchange was a form of banking, money laundering, non-licensed remittances or illegal entrepreneurship. These services exchanged fiat money on different digital currencies (1MDC, E-Gold, eCache etc.) and, in a way, fulfilled the demand of New World and EU citizens for anonymous transactions of digital and fiat money.
But, in fact, the first significant cryptocurrency exchange arose from a surprising source… The website of the online game “Magic: The Gathering Online”. This game’s name refers to a magical world, where the currency system is represented in the form of cards. Jed McCaleb, the programmer from San Francisco and future contributor for Ripple and Stellar, developed the Mt.Gox project with the purpose of trading these cards like traditional stocks. In January 2007, he purchased the domain name mtgox.com, but in 2008, he abandoned the project as a premature venture. One year later, he used this domain to advertise his own online game. In the year of 2010, he read about the concept of Bitcoin and decided to launch the Mt.Gox exchange and exchange rate service allowing to trade Bitcoin freely. The project was released on July 18, 2010.
Rapid commercial growth started when the product was sold to the French-Japanese developer Mark Karpeles in January 2011. It was the year 2011 when Mt.Gox demonstrated the main security challenges that traditional centralized exchanges will encounter all along their development path in the future. These included direct thefts from the platform’s wallets, attacks with multiple ‘ask’ orders, malefactor invasions resulting in price drops (one day, in the spring of 2011, 1 BTC was worth less than 0.01 USD) etc. By the way, the dramatic collapse of February 2014, with more than 750K BTC lost and the $65M civil suit in Tokyo court were still to come. During the years 2012–2013, every 3 of 4 Bitcoins in the world was sold via Mt.Gox, and it was a real success story.
The years 2011–2012 gave birth to the bulk of top centralized cryptocurrency exchanges. BTCC was founded in June 2011 as the first exchange for the Chinese market. At the same time, American developer Jesse Powell had spent a month visiting Mt.Gox offices to offer assistance in the aftermath of the first hack. He was unsatisfied with the level of business organization, and that was how Kraken was founded in July 2011. The infamous BTC-e platform for exchanging rubles for BTC was also launched in July 2011. In late 2011, the largest American exchange BitInstant was founded and started selling Bitcoin via WalMart and Walgreen. 2012 became the year of origin for Bitfinex, Coinbase (first Ethereum marketplace) and LocalBitcoins.

Pros and Cons of Centralized Exchanges

We are now six or seven years away of those days. Today, hundreds of centralized exchanges are offering the services of exchanging BTC, ERC-20 and another cryptos. We can even hardly classify them. Usually, specialists speak about three mainstream types of centralized exchanges.
Trading platforms. They connect buyers and sellers to each other, allowing them to publish trading orders and take some transactional fees (most commonly 0,3 per cent from the taker of the liquidity). For example, Cex.io, BitFinex, BitStamp belong to this group. Usually, these platforms are characterized by a complicated interface, which is not suitable for newbies.
Cryptocurrency brokers. If a trading platform is a local market where you buy goods from their producers, the broker is a small player on the market. They sell coins at definite prices while setting high fees, but allow acquiring cryptos in a simpler manner. Moreover, most of them support a broad range of payment tools. Coinbase, Coinmama, Coinhouse are among the most popular brokers.
Peer-to-peer-services. They simply allow their users to publish announcements about operations with cryptos. The buyer and the seller directly negotiate the prices. It is even possible to find one selling crypto for cash in your neighborhood. The most remarkable example here is LocalBitcoins.
As one can see, now the range of services offered is truly broad. By the way, there is a list of common complaints regarding centralized exchanges both from traders and crypto theoreticians.
Safety. Even a single point of centralization can lead to the massive theft of users’ funds and keys. More than a million BTCs have been stolen by the time of writing of this article.
Regulation. If the center (or even one of the centers) of a CEX is physically located in some country, the position of this country’s government on ICOs and crypto related issues becomes crucial for the future of the project. Legal restrictions in this sector are now imposed in the U.S., China, South Korea, India etc. When your exchange is centralized, the officials can arrest your cryptos for no reason. Moreover, the administration of the exchange can be involved in fraud with your private information and money.
Speed. We have conducted some particular research on the speed of popular CEXs (Binance, Huobi, Poloniex, see p. 11). The results are sad: you can wait dozens of minutes waiting for the pending of your transaction.
KYC/AML. There is nothing to talk about in this regard, we suppose. If you must send someone your photo, a scanned copy of your ID or even proof of income wanting nothing in return but to withdraw your own funds, it is not OK.

Decentralization: The Solution

Decentralization, as the initial meaning and internal essence of blockchain, smart-contracts and cryptocurrencies, was first italicized by Satoshi Nakamoto and even Nick Szabo in 1990–2000-s. The rise of CEXs resulted in an obvious contradiction, because blockchain-based currencies are being operated via centralized mechanisms just like Visa or MasterCard, but much slowly. Is it normal? Where is the next stage of evolution or, does it even exist in the first place?
The answer was the main point of arguments in the crypto community during the year of 2017. In February, Vitalik came out with the suggestion about the nature of blockchain’s decentralization: “Blockchains are politically decentralized (no one controls them) and architecturally decentralized (no infrastructural central point of failure), but they are logically centralized (there is one commonly agreed state and the system behaves like a single computer)”.
The only possible expression in the commercial implementation of ‘architectural decentralization’ is the decentralized exchange of cryptocurrencies.
And the most advanced technology in this case is that of the Atomic Swaps — the direct peer-to-peer instant cross-chain transaction.
CEXs were the natural and inevitable stage of development for cryptocurrency exchanges. By the way, the DEXs are coming: we found them (namely IDEX, EtherDelta and Waves DEX) on the list of the top-100 exchanges on Coinmarketcap.
So, the Swap.Online team is on the right track. Get ready for ERC-20 ⇔ BTC, ETH ⇔ BTC, USDT ⇔ BTC, EOS ⇔ BTC trading directly from your browser with neither middlemen nor a centralized infrastructure.
See you on the mainnet on August 27, 2018,
Swap.Online Team
submitted by noxonsu to SwapOnline [link] [comments]

Crypto Month in Review - June 2018

Previous reviews: Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr, May
Crypto moves way too fast for me to keep up, so I aggregate each day's biggest headline and publish the list at the end of the month. Below is my list for June. My main news source was reddit. My main holdings are ETH and NANO, but I try to make these lists as unbiased as possible.
Market cap movement throughout June - a slight downward trend. Mostly sideways, with some sharp downward dips it has yet to recover from.
6/1 - Huobi, the 3rd largest exchange in the world, launches a cryptocurrency ETF that tracks the top 10 cryptos. 6/2 - EOS’ year-long ICO comes to an end, raising a record $4 billion total, over twice as much as Telegram’s next most valuable ICO. 6/3 - ZenCash undergoes two consecutive 51% attacks, with the attacks taking nearly 20,000 ZEN. 6/4 - Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak says that he buys into the idea of Bitcoin becoming the single international currency. 6/5 - The Indonesian government clears cryptocurrency to be traded on futures exchanges as a commodity. 6/6 - Internal job postings reveal that Fidelity Investments is building a cryptocurrency exchange. 6/7 - MasterCard files a patent for a system that would securely verify credit card purchases using data stored on a blockchain. 6/8 - After a lengthy investigation, Korea National Tax Services fines Bithumb $30 million in unpaid taxes but finds no evidence of illegal activity. 6/9 - Columbian banks close all the accounts of South American crypto exchange Buda following legal issues with the platform. 6/10 - The EOS main net launches, but struggles to get 15% of its tokens staked, which is required for the main net to allow transactions 6/11 - Subscription-based crypto-mining company Argo Blockchain is approved to be the first blockchain related company listed on the London Stock Exchange. 6/12 - Iota and Volkswagen demonstrate a proof-of-concept for secure, over the air data exchange between autonomous vehicles at the Cebit 2018 conference. 6/13 - A study by the University of Texas at Austin concludes that the price of Bitcoin was inflated by Tether in December 2017 and January 2018. 6/14 - In both a written statement and a speech to the Yahoo All Markets: Crypto summit, SEC executive William Hinman declares that Bitcoin and Ether are not securities due to their decentralization. He also states that other ICO cryptocurrencies may be considered securities, and that it is possible for tokens to lose their security status over time. 6/15 - A fatal bug is found in the Icon smart contract that allows any unprivileged account to enable and disable ICX transfers for all accounts. 6/16 - Less than 48 hours after going live, the EOS mainnet pauses transactions to identify and fix a serious issue. 6/17 - The Brave browser commences a rollout of its ads trial program, allowing users to get paid in BAT to watch ads. 6/18 - Payment services company Square is granted a BitLicense by New York, allowing state residents to buy and sell Bitcoin through its Cash app. 6/19 - $30 million of assets are stolen from Bithumb in the second such attack against the Korean exchange in 12 months. The exchange pledges to replenish the funds themselves and ensures no losses in users’ accounts. 6/20 - A partial audit of Tether by DC law firm Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan LLP concludes that Tether has enough money to fully back every USDT in circulation. 6/21 - Nano releases mobile wallets to Android and iOS, but users immediately discover that the seed generation technique on the Android wallet is insecure. A hotfix is pushed several hours later. 6/22 - The Tokyo District Court halts the sale of any Bitcoin held by MtGox until February 2019. 6/23 - Four blockchain entrepreneurs are awarded Thiel Fellowship grants: Vest co-founder Axel Ericsson, Polkadot co-founder Robert Habermeier, MyCrypto CTO Daniel Ternyak and Mechanism Labs co-founder Aparna Krishnan. 6/24 - Chinese authorities arrest a man for allegedly stealing power to fuel a secret crypto-mining operation. 6/25 - Top venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz raises $300 million for its first dedicated cryptocurrency fund. It plans to put the money in early stage tokens, as well as later stage networks like Bitcoin and Ethereum, and hold the investments for 10 years. 6/26 - Facebook reverses its ban on cryptocurrency ads while maintaining its ban on ICO promotions. 6/27 - Malta, the current location of Binance headquarters, passes three cryptocurrency and blockchain related bills in an effort to draw more business to the “blockchain island”. 6/28 - Dan Larimer proposes an EOS “Constitution 2.0 “ through Block.one after 27 EOS accounts were frozen by EOS’ Core Arbitration Forum. 6/29 - A joint report from PricewaterhouseCoopers and the Swiss Crypto Valley Association shows that the ICO volume for 2018 has already doubled that of 2017. 6/30 - BitMEX CEO Arthur Hayes predicts the Bitcoin price to reach $50,000 by the end of 2018.
submitted by m1kec1av to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

$523M Coincheck NEM (XEM) Crypto Hack  Bigger Than Mt Gox Tokyo Whale Caused Bitcoin Crash Mt Gox Is Back! He Has More $BTC Too! Another Crash Soon? Binance Clone Script - Live Demo 2019 Mt Gox BITCOIN DUMP Incoming? - China Crypto Rankings - Chicago Mayor Crypto Adoption - XRP Ovex Mt.Gox Files for Bankruptcy as 850,000 Bitcoins Remain Missing Index Funds And Bitcoin Dumps! Binance FUD, Tokyo Whale, SEC and CFTC Press Releases - Ep159 Binance Exchange Review by FXEmpire New Crypto Price Tool / Binance Register EOS / MtGox Meeting Sept / Telegram Tokens For Sale Mt GOX What Really Happen?  Biggest Bitcoin Heist Website of Bitcoin exchange Mt.Gox offline, trader pickets building in Tokyo

According to reports, the New York-based private equity firm Fortress is offering Mt Gox creditor claims at $778 per coin. The offer is 13.5% lower than what Fortress offered in July and Mt Gox ... By 2013, the Tokyo-based Mt. Gox had become the world’s leading cryptocurrency exchange, handling 70 percent of all Bitcoin trades. But security breaches, technology problems and regulations ... Following MtGox’s bankruptcy, Bitcoin price declined to reach a bottom of around 300 USD in 2015. Despite these fluctuations, Bitcoin’s hashrate reached 1 exahash/sec for the first time in December 2015, signaling a very strong interest by miners. Chart 2 - Price of Bitcoin in USD (2016-2019) with major two forks. Source: Binance Research, Bloomberg. While the price of Bitcoin remained ... Mt. Gox was once the largest cryptocurrency exchange. The Japan-based platform was responsible for more than 70% of all Bitcoin transactions during its peak years ago. However, the exchange became the victim of a massive attack in 2014 that resulted in the theft of 850,000 bitcoins (worth about $470 million at the time or nearly $10 billion ... On March 24, the Mt Gox creditors’ trustee from Tokyo, Nobuaki Kobayashi, disclosed a newly written rehabilitation plan for claimants looking to access some of the funds they lost in 2013. However, the decision on the distribution of funds is still pending. The exchange assets are held by the Trustee, Nobuaki Kobayashi, and the rehabilitation proposals are overseen by the Tokyo District Court. According to a March 2019 report, the trustee has a cash/bank balance of over $600 million. Moreover, it has 141,686.35371099 BTC and ... At one point, the Tokyo-based exchange was handling more than 70 percent of the world’s bitcoin transactions. Currently, Binance is the largest crypto exchange. Mt. Gox collapsed in 2014 after ...

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$523M Coincheck NEM (XEM) Crypto Hack Bigger Than Mt Gox

Mt. Gox a name synonymous with crypto exchanges and the trouble that comes along with them, is once again back in the crypto news. The website https://www.go... - China’s 11th Crypto Rankings: EOS First, TRON Second, Ethereum Third, Bitcoin Fifteenth - Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel Says Crypto Adoption Could Be Inevitable - South Aftican exchange Ovex went ... Today we're witnessing a perfect storm of FUD that's driving the price of crypto down across the board. We'll dive into: - BTC Price action - Binance "hack" and its impact - The Tokyo Whale who ... I am sharing my biased opinion based off speculation. You should not take my opinion as financial advice. You should always do your research before making any investment. You should also ... Tokyo-based Bitcoin exchange MtGox has filed for bankruptcy protection as 850,000 Bitcoins have gone missing. After halting withdrawals for a month upon discovering a security flaw in its computer ... • The exchange is based in Japan, Tokyo • Binance comes from the word – Binary finance Highlights of Binance exchange website There are some rock solid reasons why people are looking forward ... So basically if you have your EOS tokens stored on Binance at the beginning of June when the network goes live, they will take care of the technical requirements of converting the Ethereum based ... The website of major bitcoin exchange Mt.Gox was offline on Tuesday amid reports it had suffered a debilitating theft - a new setback for efforts to gain legitimacy for the virtual currency. Established recently in mid-2017, Binance is new cryptocurrency exchange that is geared towards crypto-to-crypto trading. The platform is based in Shanghai China and is headed by Changpeng Zhao. One of the largest online exchanges for Bitcoins, a digital cryptocurrency "mined" by computers, has closed down amid allegations of theft. The founder of the Tokyo-based Mt. Gox website admitted ...

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